Monthly Archives: November 2015

Meeting the Need for Speed

Bandwidth demand continues to grow unabated and is predicted to increase at a compound annual rate of nearly 25 percent over the next five years.  The use of virtualization in servers has driven intra-data center traffic to new levels, while the rapid deployment of cloud computing applications is creating demand for higher-speed enterprise networks.

In a new article in BICSI’s ICT Today, John Kamino and Roman Shubochkin of OFS discuss how the optical fiber and cabling industry is supporting this need for higher network speeds by developing a new, next-generation multimode fiber – wideband multimode fiber.  Learn more here!

 

What Lies Ahead for Multimode Optical Fiber

Multimode optical fiber has supported the transmission speeds of the fastest networks for many years, with refinements in the fiber manufacturing process enabling increased bandwidth and throughput capability. OM4 fiber is currently the highest-performing, standardized multimode fiber.

In an upcoming webcast sponsored by Cabling Installation & Maintenance, Tony Irujo of OFS will look ahead to the future of multimode fiber, describing the next generation of fiber technology and, specifically, applications for which it is appropriate.

To participate in this complimentary webcast on November 19, please register HERE.

High-Peak-Power Pulse Amplification in Higher-Order Mode Fibers

Optical fiber lasers are often used in commercial applications including remote sensing and materials processing. Because these applications can benefit from high-peak powers and pulse energies, there is a corresponding need to reduce nonlinearities caused by high-peak intensities.

Researchers have used a number of approaches to increase the effective area of the fibers in order to achieve large-mode area (LMA) high-power fiber lasers. However, with these techniques, the fibers are operated in the fundamental mode which creates a significant reduction in mode area when the fiber is coiled. The results are that it is difficult to scale the effective area of the fundamental mode beyond 1000 microns and peak powers are limited to a few hundred kilowatts. In this way, the robust and compact packaging benefits of high-power fiber lasers are often lost when LMA fiber designs are used.

In an article written for SPIE Newsroom, Dr. Jeff Nicholson of OFS Laboratories explains how his team overcame this problem using an OFS designed, bulk-optic mode converter that uses an axicon for the output of HOM (High Order Mode) fiber amplifiers.

To read more, please go HERE.