The Standards They Are A-Changin’

Recent activity in the TIA TR-42 Engineering Committee produced multiple standards affecting the specification, design, installation and management of fiber optic cabling components and systems.

To help providers understand these changing standards, Product Manager John Kamino will take center stage in a webinar sponsored by Cabling Installation and Maintenance on October 27, 2016. During this session, John will discuss topics including the ANSI/TIA-492AAAE Standard for Wideband Multimode Fiber and revisions in the TIA-942-B standard for Data Center Cabling.

To learn more and register for this webinar, please visit HERE.

Specialty Optical Fiber Coatings: Weathering the “Storm”

Different applications and optical fiber types present varying requirements for fiber coatings. When specialty optical fibers are used in demanding conditions, the fibers require coatings that are sustainable when subjected to harsh circumstances.

In fact, the successful deployment of fiber in these environments can often depend far more on the fiber’s protective external coating rather than its internal optical design. Fibers may be under attack from high and low temperature ranges, excessive humidity, high pressure, aggressive chemicals, mechanical interactions or any combination of these elements.

A recent OFS white paper in NASA Tech Briefs evaluates the stability of commercially available and in-house formulated, acrylate-based coatings to help determine the optimum coating for a range of conditions.

Meeting the Data Center Demand for Increased Bandwidth

Today’s data centers are increasingly using 40 and 100 Gb/s Ethernet speeds. Work is also underway to develop 400 Gb/s Ethernet and 256 Gb/s Fiber Channel standards for next-generation networks. How are the optical fiber and structured cabling industries responding to this growth in demand for bandwidth?

To learn more, mark your calendar to hear OFS’ John Kamino (BICSI RCDD) Senior Manager – Multimode Fiber Product Management cover this and other topics during his “Next-Generation Multimode Fiber” presentation at the BICSI Winter Conference in Orlando on Tuesday, February 2, 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m.  For more information on this topic, please go HERE.

Advanced Fiber Optic Technologies for Next-Generation Networking

If you missed the recent webcast on “Advanced Fiber Optic Technologies for Next-Generation Networking,” you’re in luck.  This webinar produced by Cabling Installation & Maintenance, is still available for viewing.

The seminar examines several of the latest developments in fiber optic cabling infrastructure and also places specific emphasis on how these advancements position optical fiber as a medium prepared for the next generation of networking.  To access the webcast, please go HERE.

Managing Change in Data Center Cabling and Systems

From network cabling to supporting infrastructure, every system in a data center must deliver solid, consistent performance.  However, because data centers are subject to frequent reconfiguration, they must also be adaptable to change.

A recent webcase seminar from Cabling Installation & Maintenance provides an inside look at technologies that can help data centers to meet the challenge of remaining both dependable and flexible.

 

Testing Bend-Insensitive Multimode Fiber Links

Enterprise networks and data centers around the world are increasingly installing bend-insensitive OM3 and OM4 Multimode Fibers. These fibers interoperate well with the embedded base of multimode fiber. However, if a link is not characterized properly, misleading test results can occur.

In BICSI’s ICT Today magazine, Dave Mazzarese describes how to properly measure the channel insertion loss of a multimode optical fiber link and why using the prescribed method is important.

Choosing the Right Fiber for In-Building Applications

Network owners are increasingly converting their data center and enterprise telecommunication/data communication systems from copper cabling to optical fiber.  Because these applications have shorter overall spans and often use connectors instead of splices, they differ from what is typically seen in long-haul, metropolitan and access deployments.

As the use of optical fiber continues to grow in these networks, Technical Manager Dave Mazzarese has identified five key things that users should know about selecting a fiber for in-building applications. To learn more and access Dave’s complete analysis, please go here.

 

OFS Proposes Defining New Multimode Optical Fiber

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At the most recent TIA 42.11 Subcommittee meeting, Dave Mazzarese of OFS proposed defining a new, next-generation multimode optical fiber. This new fiber would facilitate the use of low-cost, coarse wavelength division multiplexing (CWDM) equipment on multimode fiber. The proposed fiber would not only provide up to four times the information carrying capacity of current OM4 fiber, but also offer the potential for even higher capacity solutions in the future, while maintaining the backward compatibility to current 850 nm based systems.

This new fiber would continue to maintain the low system cost advantage that multimode fiber links have over single-mode fiber systems. The wide-band fiber is expected to initially support four wavelengths at speeds up to 28 Gb/s, providing 100+ Gb/s fiber capacity. This capability would significantly reduce the amount of fiber required to carry 400 Gb/s signals, the next-generation Ethernet speed.

Dave notes that defining a new fiber has the support of key players in the industry, including Avago, CommScope, Finisar and Panduit.

The Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) is accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) to develop voluntary, consensus-based industry standards for a wide variety of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) products, and currently represents nearly 400 companies. Within TIA, the 42.11 Subcommittee helps develop and maintain voluntary standards for optical fiber used in telecommunications cabling infrastructure in premises.

Sterilization Effects on Key Properties of Optical Fibers

Optical fibers are successfully used in various areas, such as cardiology and so much more!
Optical fibers are successfully
used in various areas, such as
cardiology and so much more!

Optical fibers are successfully used in various areas of medicine, including urology, general surgery, ophthalmology, cardiology, endoscopy, dentistry and medical sensing [1 – 4]. Prior to use inside a human body the fiber must be sterilized to ensure it is free of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, and virus or spore forms. Read More…

Bandwidth of Avionics Cables – OM3 vs OM4

FlightLink™ Avionics Cables
FlightLink™ Avionics Cables

OFS FlightLink™ OM3 Cable designed for commercial aircraft, is a perfect example of the application specific solutions that OFS manufactures. All fiber is manufactured at OFS and our broad portfolio of specialty materials for buffers, strength members and jackets allow us to tailor products to meet or exceed the requirements of a given application. Avionics cables whether for commercial or military avionics have stringent requirements across the board, must be fully qualified and offer long lifetime. Read More…