A Miniature Turnaround for Distributed Temperature Sensing

Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing systems (DTS) are valuable tools used for a broad range of applications, including the monitoring of hydrologic systems and power cables, and the detection of pipeline leaks. In many fiber optic DTS systems, a dual-ended configuration can correct the temperature measurement error associated with wavelength dependent loss (WDL) of the optical fiber. This design can also provide a more accurate temperature measurement when compared with a single-ended fiber system.

Xiaoguang Sun, David T. Burgess, Kyle Bedard, Jie Li and Mike Hines of OFS recently presented a white paper on this subject at the 2015 SPIE Defense, Security and Sensing Conference. This paper focuses on their research findings when a miniature-turnaround device built with a short section of a graded index (GI) fiber is used. To read more, please go HERE.

GigaNet – Forward to the Future!

OFS recently helped to deploy a turnkey Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) network in the City of Sandy, Oregon. This new network brings 1 GB/s broadband service to approximately 3,500 residents via SandyNet, the internet service provider (ISP) owned by the community and operated by the city since 2003. Sandy is only one of many communities across the nation that have deployed their own high-speed FTTH network. Many of these communities lack a service provider, have limited broadband options or have been largely ignored in the nationwide push for gigabit service. (more…)

Riding the Winds of Change

With the opening next week of the 2015 American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) Windpower Conference, fiber optics and wind power are particularly timely topics.

According to Industrial Marketing Analyst Natalia Juhasz, people often fail to realize that the many uses of optical fiber include industrial networking, such as control systems for wind power. In fact, industrialized fiber optics can provide an effective means to transmit data in harsh, outdoor environments.

How can the wind industry benefit from using fiber optic technology? (more…)

Choosing the Right Fiber for In-Building Applications

Network owners are increasingly converting their data center and enterprise telecommunication/data communication systems from copper cabling to optical fiber.  Because these applications have shorter overall spans and often use connectors instead of splices, they differ from what is typically seen in long-haul, metropolitan and access deployments.

As the use of optical fiber continues to grow in these networks, Technical Manager Dave Mazzarese has identified five key things that users should know about selecting a fiber for in-building applications. To learn more and access Dave’s complete analysis, please go here.

 

OFS Proposes Defining New Multimode Optical Fiber

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At the most recent TIA 42.11 Subcommittee meeting, Dave Mazzarese of OFS proposed defining a new, next-generation multimode optical fiber. This new fiber would facilitate the use of low-cost, coarse wavelength division multiplexing (CWDM) equipment on multimode fiber. The proposed fiber would not only provide up to four times the information carrying capacity of current OM4 fiber, but also offer the potential for even higher capacity solutions in the future, while maintaining the backward compatibility to current 850 nm based systems.

This new fiber would continue to maintain the low system cost advantage that multimode fiber links have over single-mode fiber systems. The wide-band fiber is expected to initially support four wavelengths at speeds up to 28 Gb/s, providing 100+ Gb/s fiber capacity. This capability would significantly reduce the amount of fiber required to carry 400 Gb/s signals, the next-generation Ethernet speed.

Dave notes that defining a new fiber has the support of key players in the industry, including Avago, CommScope, Finisar and Panduit.

The Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) is accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) to develop voluntary, consensus-based industry standards for a wide variety of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) products, and currently represents nearly 400 companies. Within TIA, the 42.11 Subcommittee helps develop and maintain voluntary standards for optical fiber used in telecommunications cabling infrastructure in premises.

Sterilization Effects on Key Properties of Optical Fibers

Optical fibers are successfully used in various areas, such as cardiology and so much more!
Optical fibers are successfully
used in various areas, such as
cardiology and so much more!

Optical fibers are successfully used in various areas of medicine, including urology, general surgery, ophthalmology, cardiology, endoscopy, dentistry and medical sensing [1 – 4]. Prior to use inside a human body the fiber must be sterilized to ensure it is free of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, and virus or spore forms. Read More…

Bandwidth of Avionics Cables – OM3 vs OM4

FlightLink™ Avionics Cables
FlightLink™ Avionics Cables

OFS FlightLink™ OM3 Cable designed for commercial aircraft, is a perfect example of the application specific solutions that OFS manufactures. All fiber is manufactured at OFS and our broad portfolio of specialty materials for buffers, strength members and jackets allow us to tailor products to meet or exceed the requirements of a given application. Avionics cables whether for commercial or military avionics have stringent requirements across the board, must be fully qualified and offer long lifetime. Read More…