Optical Fiber Building Solutions

FTTX Building Optimized Fiber Infrastructure

Optical fiber-to-the-business deployment is accelerating globally to support increasing internet speeds of up to 1 Gigabit per second, and 10 Gigabit speeds that are already available in some regions. Service providers are responding by installing optical fiber both to and deep inside buildings to the living unit.

The Solutions in this 64-page guide can help reduce both first and life cycle costs of optical fiber deployments to residential and business customers.

Solutions for both Greenfield installation during building construction and Brownfield installation in existing buildings are included. Scalable and optimized to fit a broad range of building structures, these solutions offer faster, reliable installation through innovative labor saving technologies, using less space than conventional approaches.

Solutions for both indoor and outdoor deployment offer flexibility to use the best available pathways for each building. The solution building blocks include a wide range of terminals, splitters, point-of-entry modules, riser cables, attic and wall fish fiber, hallway fiber and complete indoor living unit fiber kits. This portfolio allows service providers to select the best solution for each building, and OFS can help design building specific solutions and bills of material as a value added service.

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FIBER TO THE BUILDING BENEFITS 

OFS fiber-to-the-subscriber (FTTx) solutions help to revolutionize the speed of installing fibers; enhance the customer experience; minimize disruption; reduce labor costs; increase subscriber take rates; enable faster time to revenue for service providers; and get Gigabit and higher speeds faster to subscribers.

OPTICAL FIBER BUILDING CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS 

  • Time to revenue: Fast and easy to install pre-terminated solutions can speed installation and reduce labor costs.
  • No pathways, requiring labor intensive cut and patch: Compact surface mounted fiber solutions.
  • Limited closet space: Smaller enclosures can enable installation of multiple operator connections in a small telecommunications closet.
  • Multiple boxes for splicing and splitter connections: Single box pre-terminated solutions can require less space and enable faster provisioning.
  • No duct space: Compact surface mounted fiber solutions either inside or on the outside of the building do not require duct.
  • Shared infrastructure: Compact cables can support multiple service providers in telecommunication pathways.
  • Fiber bends around many corners: Bend-insensitive fiber specified to support bend radius as low as 2.5 mm.
  • Disruptive/noisy to tenants: Optical solutions that are virtually invisible can be installed quickly and quietly and preserve the building decor.
  • Service disruptions and lost subscribers: Full solution of fiber, cable and connectors from one company, designed to work together. Factory tested to Tier 1 standards.
  • Multiple building types: Solutions to fit each building type.

PRE-TERMINATED vs. FIELD TERMINATED OPTICAL FIBER

Pre-terminated solutions are increasingly used to install fiber in Multiple Dwelling Unit (MDU) buildings to save time and money in higher labor cost regions. Pre-terminated products with built-in slack management are preferred so installers can neatly manage excess slack and use a single component to support multiple deployment lengths. Nevertheless, field terminated solutions can complement pre-terminated parts of the indoor or outdoor network and, for low labor cost markets, field terminated solutions may be preferred. OFS offers both pre-terminated and field terminated solutions to fit the needs of each service provider.

OPTICAL FIBER SPECIFICATIONS OPTIMIZED TO THE APPLICATION

Installing optical fiber in buildings and homes often requires conforming the fiber around sharp corners. EZ- Bend® Single-Mode Fiber offers outstanding bend performance down to a 2.5 mm radius for the most challenging in-residence and MDU applications. Compatible with the installed base of conventional G.652.D single-mode fibers, the fiber meets and exceeds ITU-T G.657.B3 recommendations. EZ-Bend fiber uses patented, groundbreaking EZ-Bend Optical Technology from OFS to provide three times lower loss at tight bends than competing G.657.B3 products.

Centralized, Distributed and Distributed Cascaded Splitting

As FTTx deployment accelerates globally to meet increasing bandwidth needs, service providers must install optical fiber both to and inside the building for business and residential subscribers. Building types include duplexes, garden style, low rise (less than 10 floors), mid rise (10 to 15 floors), high rise (16 to 40 floors) and skyscrapers (40 floors and above). To provide building Gigabit services, providers must place optical cables in building risers and ducts, install optical fiber in hallways, and then take this fiber deep into the units, connecting to an indoor Optical Network Terminal (ONT). How can providers accomplish this in buildings that can vary widely in design, materials and available pathways?

Splitter Architectures

Cascaded SplitterA typical PON network consists of the Optical Line Terminal (OLT) in a central office, head end or cabinet, connected by a feeder cable to optical splitters, and then to distribution cables downstream in the network. Choosing the right architecture depends upon end-user density, projected subscription rates and distance from the OLT. Splitter placement is important in FTTx design as it can significantly affect plant and electronics costs.

Three common types of splitter architectures are used when deploying FTTx:

  • Centralized splitting
  • Distributed splitting
  • Distributed cascaded splitting

To help meet these needs, the OFS portfolio supports all three splitter architectures, and features a broad range of solutions to meet the requirements of virtually any MDU deployment. For flexibility and regional preferences, these offers include a mix of pre-connectorized, in-field fusion splicing and mechanical connector solutions from which OFS can configure customized designs for each type of building.

Brownfield Outdoor Facade Solution

The Outdoor Facade Solution is used when property owners want to preserve the decor of the building exterior. The compact EZ-Bend Indoor/Outdoor cable is placed vertically on the exterior wall of the residence from an outdoor wall mount box to an indoor SlimBox® unit. The indoor SlimBox can be factory configured with SCA adapters or fanouts for a pre-terminated solution, or for fusion splicing. EZ-Bend jumpers are used for the path to each living unit. Pre-terminated EZ-Bend Jumpers are recommended for faster installation, or a mechanical connector may be used for field termination in the SlimBox Wall Plate. The 80×80 InvisiLight® Module can be used as a “fiber extension” to any location in the living unit. Alternatively, instead of EZ-Bend jumpers, the InvisiLight MDU solution may be placed in the hallway to the living units (not shown).

Brownfield Outdoor Facade Solution

Brownfield Outdoor Facade Solution

Greenfield Pre-Terminated Solution

TELECOMMUNICATION ROOM

  • Compact basement box for a progressive customer activation;
  • The basement box (SlimBox 64F Terminal) allows fusion splices for the outside plant cable;
  • Ideal for buildings with low penetration rates: One splitter can be installed and the management of the customers is done through the SCA ports. A parking area permits easy connection of new customers;
  • Several boxes can be connected for modular expansion. Connections between multiple SlimBoxes are possible through access openings between them.

RISER BACKBONE

  • SCA pre-terminated cables for quick plug and play installation;
  • EZ-Bend patch cords directly from the apartment unit may be used for small buildings.

HORIZONTAL DEPLOYMENT

  • Direct deployment from the telecommunication closet to the apartment unit;
  • Ideal for Greenfield installation;
  • The EZ-Bend jumper is connected to an adapter installed in the SlimBox Wall Plate (inside the living unit).

INSIDE THE LIVING UNIT

  • An SCA mechanical connector can be used to terminate the EZ-Bend Jumper inside the living unit;
  • The InvisiLight ILU Solution is a complementary product used to extend the fiber inside the apartment.

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Greenfield Fusion Spliced or Field Terminated Solution

TELECOMMUNICATION ROOM

  • Compact basement box for a progressive customer activation (parking up to 48 connectors in the SlimBox 64F Terminal);
  • The basement box (SlimBox 64F Terminal) allows fusion splices for the outside plant cable and the internal cables (up to 96 fusion splices – 8 splice trays with 12 splices in each one);
  • Ideal for buildings with low penetration rate: One splitter can be installed with management of the customers done through the SCA ports. A parking area permits easy connection of new customers;
  • Several boxes can be connected for modular expansion. Connections between SlimBoxes are possible through access openings between them.

RISER BACKBONE

  • ACCUMAX® cables may be used for quick and easy installation:
  • SCA pre-terminated pigtails are used for fusion splicing inside the basement and floor boxes.

HORIZONTAL DEPLOYMENT

  • Direct deployment from the telecommunication closet to the apartment unit through EZ-Bend cable (ruggedized 3.0 or 4.8 mm);
  • The horizontal cable is fusion spliced or field terminated with a mechanical connector in the SlimBox 12F Terminal (floor distribution box) and in the SlimBox Wall Plate (inside the living unit).

INSIDE THE LIVING UNIT

  • An SCA mechanical connector can be used to terminate the EZ-Bend Jumper inside the living unit or a pre-terminated pigtail can be used;
  • The InvisiLight ILU Solution is a complementary product used to extend the fiber inside the apartment.

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Brownfield Pre-Terminated Solution

Brownfield Pre-Terminated Solution

Brownfield Pre-Terminated Solution

TELECOMMUNICATION ROOM

  • Compact basement box for progressive customer activation;
  • The basement box (SlimBox™ 64F Terminal) allows fusion splices to the outside plant cable;
  • Ideal for buildings with low penetration rate: One splitter can be installed with management of the customers done through the SCA ports. A parking area permits easy connection of new customers;
  • Boxes can be added for modular expansion. Connections between SlimBox units are easily made using jumpers through multiple ports designed into the box.

RISER BACKBONE

  • SCA pre-terminated cables for quick plug and play installation:
  • It is possible to place InvisiLight 2.0 mm 12-Fiber multifiber cord directly from the basement box and down hallways in small or garden style buildings.

HORIZONTAL DEPLOYMENT

  • The InvisiLight MDU Point of Entry (POE) Module offers a discrete solution using field termination inside the module;
  • Virtually invisible installation using the InvisiLight 12F Pe-terminated 2.0 mm cord.

INSIDE THE LIVING UNIT

  • InvisiLight ILU Solution is complementary and connects to the InvisiLight MDU installation;
  • InvisiLight ILU Solution is installed with the same tools and procedures as the InvisiLight MDU Solution

This 64-page guide with illustrations and part specifications will help in  selecting the right fiber optic cables and accessories to reduce both the first and life cycle costs of fiber deployments to business customers inside buildings.

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Choosing Between Single Mode vs Multimode Fibers

Single Mode vs Multimode Fibers

Learn the differences and when to use single mode or multimode fibers.

Cloud computing and web services continue to drive increased bandwidth demand, pushing data communications rates from 1 and 10G to 40 and 100G and beyond in enterprise and data center networks.


These higher speeds might lead system designers to believe that single-mode optical fiber enjoys an increasing advantage over multimode optical fiber in premises applications. However, higher Ethernet speeds do not automatically mean that single-mode optical fiber is the right choice.


Although single-mode optical fiber holds advantages in terms of bandwidth and reach for longer distances, multimode optical fiber easily supports most distances required for enterprise and data center networks, at a cost significantly less than single-mode.


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Total Cost Comparison of Single Mode vs Multimode Fibers

Optical Fiber Networks

Multimode optical fiber continues to be the more cost-effective choice over single-mode optical fiber for shorter-reach applications. While the actual cost of multimode cable is greater than that of single-mode fiber optic cable, it is the optics that dominate the total cost of a network system, dwarfing variation in cable costs.


On average, single-mode transceivers continue to cost from 1.5 to 4 – 5 times more than multimode transceivers, depending on the data rate. As faster optoelectronic technology matures and volumes increase, prices come down for both, and the cost gap between multimode and single-mode decreases. However, single-mode optics have always been more expensive than their equivalent multimode counterparts. This fact is supported by the difference in multimode vs. single-mode 10G optics, a common Ethernet speed used today.


Multimode transceivers also consume less power than single-mode transceivers, an important consideration especially when assessing the cost of powering and cooling a data center. In a large data center with thousands of links, a multimode solution can provide substantial cost savings, from both a transceiver and power/cooling perspective.


Finally, the fact that multimode optical fiber is easier to install and terminate in the field is an important consideration for enterprise environments, with their frequent moves, adds and changes.

The Difference Between Multimode and Single-Mode Fibers

The way in which these two fiber types transmit light eventually led to their separate names. Generally designed for systems of moderate to long distance (e.g., metro, access and long-haul networks), single-mode optical fibers have a small core size (< 10 µm) that permits only one mode or ray of light to be transmitted. This tiny core requires precision alignment to inject light from the transceiver into the core, significantly driving up transceiver costs.

In comparison, multimode optical fibers have larger cores that guide many modes simultaneously. The larger core makes it much easier to capture light from a transceiver, allowing source costs to be controlled. Similarly, multimode connectors cost less than single-mode connectors as a result of the more stringent alignment requirements of single-mode optical fiber. Single-mode connections require greater care and skill to terminate, which is why components are often pre-terminated at the factory. On the other hand, multimode connections can be easily performed in the field, offering installation flexibility, cost savings and peace of mind.


For these reasons, multimode optical fiber systems continue to be the most cost-effective fiber choice for enterprise and data center applications up to the 500 – 600 meter range.


Beyond the reach of multimode optical fibers, it becomes necessary to use single-mode optical fiber. However, when assessing single-mode optical fibers, be sure to consider newer options. A bend-insensitive, full-spectrum single-mode optical fiber provides more transceiver options, greater bandwidth and is less sensitive to handling of the cables and patch cords than is conventional single-mode optical fiber.


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Which Multimode Fiber Type and Why?

At one time, the network designer or end user who specified multimode optical fiber for short reach systems had to choose from two fiber types defined by their core size, namely, 50 micron (µm) or 62.5 µm. Now, that choice is slightly different: choose from OM3, OM4, or the new OM5 grade of 50 µm multimode optical fibers. Today, 62.5 µm OM1 multimode optical fiber is virtually obsolete and is relegated for use with extensions or repairs of legacy, low bandwidth systems. In fact, 62.5 µm OM1 fiber supports only 33 meters at 10G and is not even recognized as an option for faster speeds.


Optical Fiber50 µm multimode optical fibers were first deployed in the 1970s for both short and long reach applications. But as data rates increased, 50 µm fiber’s reach became limited with the LED light sources used at the time. To resolve this, 62.5 µm multimode optical fiber was developed and introduced in the 1980s. With its larger core, 62.5 µm optical fiber coupled more signal power than 50 µm optical fiber, allowing for longer reach (2 kms) at 10 Mb/s to support campus applications. That was the only time when 62.5 µm fiber offered an advantage over 50 µm optical fiber.


With the advent of gigabit (1 Gb/s) speeds and the introduction of the 850 nm VCSEL laser light source in the mid-1990s, we saw a shift back to 50 µm optical fiber, with its inherently higher bandwidth. Today, 50 µm laser-optimized multimode (OM3, OM4, and OM5) optical fibers offer significant bandwidth and reach advantages for short reach applications, while preserving the low system cost advantages of multimode optical fiber.

Planning for the Future

Industry standards groups including IEEE (Ethernet), INCITS (Fibre Channel), TIA, ISO/IEC and others continue to include multimode optical fiber as the short reach solution for next generation speeds. This designation reinforces multimode optical fiber’s continued economic advantage for these applications.


IEEE includes multimode optical fiber in its 40G and 100G Ethernet standards as well as its pending 50G, 200G, and 400G standards. In addition, TIA issued a new standard for the next generation of multimode optical fiber called wide band (OM5) multimode optical fiber. This new version of 50 µm optical fiber can transmit multiple wavelengths using Short Wavelength Division Multiplexing (SWDM) technology, while maintaining OM4 backward compatibility. In this way, end users can obtain greater bandwidth and higher speeds from a single fiber by simply adding wavelengths. The OFS version of this fiber is called LaserWave® WideBand Optical Fiber. This new fiber allows for continued economic benefit in deploying short reach optics using multimode optical fiber – as opposed to more expensive single-mode optics.

In Conclusion

In general, multimode optical fiber continues to be the most cost-effective choice for enterprise and data center applications up to the 500 – 600 meter range. Beyond that, single-mode optical fiber is necessary.


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Single-Mode Optical Fiber Selection Guide

Single-mode selection guide cover

Download the OFS single-mode optical fiber selection guide for terrestrial applications. Optical fiber applications include transcontinental, regional, metropolitan, home/business access and in-building fiber optic systems. The guide describes several families of OFS optical fibers and provides recommendations for single-mode fibers used in Outside Plant (OSP) as well as Indoor (Premises, Enterprise) applications and their benefits.

 

Selecting the right single-mode fiber for your application can help lower system costs. Characteristics such as lower loss, larger effective area, optimized dispersion and tight bend performance can provide economic benefits compared to using a standard G.652.D single-mode fiber. Please contact OFS for more thorough explanations of the various fiber value propositions to assist with the selection process.

 

OFS families of Single-Mode Optical Fibers include:

• TeraWave® Optical Fibers - ITU-T G.654 long haul fiber with optimized large effective area designed specifically to support coherent systems.
• TrueWave® Optical Fibers – ITU-T G.655 and/or G.656 Non-Zero Dispersion fibers (NZDF) that have reduced chromatic dispersion characteristics to simplify dispersion compensation.
• AllWave® Optical Fibers – ITU-T G.652.D standard single-mode fibers. AllWave Fibers provide seamless splicing and are zero water peak (ZWP) and can be used everywhere from long haul to shorter reach in-building applications. Some of these fibers are also G.657 compliant.
• AllWave® FLEX and EZ-Bend® Optical Fibers are ITU-T G.657 bend insensitive single-mode fibers

 

Loass Chart

Single-Mode Optical Fiber Application Comparison Charts Include:
• Long Haul - >1000 km*
• Regional, Metro, Utility, Wireless Backhaul - 60 to 1000 km
• FTTx: Home, Business, Cell Site - Up to 60 km - All types and data rates of PON and single-mode point-to-point networks.
• High Density Applications

 

 

Premises, Drop, Cabinet and Connectivity Application Selection Charts Include:
• Central Office, Head End, Data Center, Cabinets, Fiber to the Antenna, General In-Building
• Drop and in the Living Unit